MEETINGS

  • Regular meetings occur every 2ND SATURDAY of the month at 9am.
  • Theory meetings occur every 4TH WEDNESDAY of the month at 6pm.
  • Special meetings occur sporadically (see below).
  • Receive announcements through Meetup or Patreon

COVID-19 DISCLAIMER: Over the past year, the group hosted events online using Zoom. We are now taking the Summer to slowly transition back to in-person meetings (while preserving some online events for those that prefer them). Please be patient and don’t hesitate to reach out to me if you have questions, concerns, or suggestions. — Justin K.



NEXT REGULAR MEETING!

When: Saturday, Aug. 14th at 9am (until 11am)

Where: IN-PERSON (register with our Meetup, our Patreon, or just email me at lastoics@gmail.com for the venue details)

What about: We’ll be discussing Plato’s Apology of Socrates. Socrates was very influential for many philosophical schools that sprung in up in Athens after his death and Stoicism is no exception. Plato’s account of Socrates’s defense speech (his apologia), written shortly after the actual historic events, is considered the most elegant articulation of a what a philosophical way-of-life provides to and demands from its adherents.

NOTE: Use whichever translation you prefer (it might be beneficial to compare them). My favorite translation is the Grube/Reeve edition. A close second is the Jowett edition, which is conveniently in the public domain: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Apology_(Plato) … … If you want to read more texts about Socrates written by his contemporaries, or can find more info on my “Commemorating Socrates” page. Let me know if you have questions.

PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS OR WOULD LIKE SUGGESTIONS OF FURTHER READING.

In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may…

  • select a passage or two to share and discuss;
  • think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or
  • edit the slideshow
  • email me in advance at lastoics@gmail.com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful.

See you then! –Justin K.



NEXT THEORY MEETING!

When: Wednesday, July 28th at 6pm (until 8pm)

Where: ONLINE VIA ZOOM

How:

  • REGISTER: Register in advance for this meeting using the following ‘registration link’: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZclfuqrqTgjG9BkI5rfuZlGpPabqeQEpDWL
  • JOIN: After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing a personalized ‘join link’ that you will use to enter the Zoom meeting when the time comes. Your ‘join link’ may be used for all the ‘Theory Meetings’ up through July (when we’ll be finishing the current text)—no need to register again.

What about: Brian E. Johnson’s The Role Ethics of Epictetus (2013), Ch. 9 ―Johnson concludes his comparison between Epictetus’s role ethics with the Cicero’s. This also serves as the conclusion of the book, so we will also discuss options for August’s reading.

PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS OR NEED A PDF COPY OF THE READING (YOU MAY ALSO INCLUDE QUESTIONS/COMMENTS IN ZOOM REGISTRATION FORM)

In terms of preparing, you should read as much as you can (though you don’t need to do the entire reading to get something out of these meetings!). At the very least, …

  • select a few passages to share and discuss;
  • think of questions to propose (or answer) and/OR
  • email me in advance at lastoics@gmail.com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful.

See you then! –Justin K.



NEXT SPECIAL MEETING!

Stoic Game Night Afternoon!

When: Saturday, July 31st (exact time TBD)

Where: IN-PERSON (register with our Meetup, our Patreon, or just email me at lastoics@gmail.com for the venue details)

Summary: We will be spending a couple hours in the afternoon playing games and talking about Stoicism.

More details: The point is to create low-stakes situations where we can practice Stoic techniques that are meant to promote the ‘good life.’ Playing games may illicit some states-of-mind akin to the harmful emotions (pathê) that we experience in our everyday life. If we can be a bit more mindful of how we approach these games, we may be able to transfer the benefits of this mindfulness to higher-stakes situations elsewhere… You might think this silly, but – Seneca put it best – “Believe me, real joy is a serious matter” (Letters 23.4). And if we don’t stumble upon any deep insights, I think we can still have fun and cultivate a sense of community while we’re at it.